IF-1667

From Blaseball Wiki

COMMUNITY REPORTS
The remainder of this article contains lore created collaboratively by the Blaseball community.
A navy and light blue logo of a skull and crossbones. Within the eyes of the skull are the kanji for Tokyo in white. The skull is flanked by light blue flowers. Past the flowers, there is a salmon with legs on either side of the logo. The word "TOKYO" is written in white across the forehead of the skull and the word "ADRIFT" is written across a banner in the jaws of the skull.
An artist's rendition of The Tokyo Adrift's logo, based on sketches and descriptions in the journal.

The following accounts can be traced to a single leather-bound journal originally found in a locked wooden chest alongside a sextant-like device of indeterminate origin and a shell that matches no known species of mollusc. The chest was located in a storage room in the Legscraper’s lower levels that was described as “smelling faintly of the sea”. Subsequent attempts to locate and navigate to said room have been unsuccessful thus far. The journal details the exploits of the crew of a large sailing vessel, The Tokyo Adrift, descriptions of which are largely consistent with mid-17th century galleons.


Rumors

IF-1667 has 27 Rumors written so far.

Kline Greenlemon/IF-1667

AVAST!
The waters beyond this point are uncharted, tales from distant shores echoed back into our reality.

Background

The following accounts can be traced to a single leather-bound journal originally found in a locked wooden chest alongside a sextant-like device of indeterminate origin and a shell that matches no known species of mollusc. The chest was located in a storage room in the Legscraper’s lower levels that was described as “smelling faintly of the sea”. Subsequent attempts to locate and navigate to said room have been unsuccessful thus far. The journal details the exploits of the crew of a large sailing vessel, The Tokyo Adrift, descriptions of which are largely consistent with mid-17th century galleons.

With the Tokyo Adrift

Kline Greenlemon lived on a small island in the Atlantic, and owned a shop making and mending clothes. One day, the Tokyo Adrift crew landed on their shores and came upon Greenlemon's shop. The crew purchased some clothes from them, and soon decided to invite them onboard. The crew was lacking someone with sewing skills, and Greenlemon was just the person for the job. During their tenure on the ship, they mended clothes, made new clothes as needed, made eyepatches, and mended torn sails. And mysteriously, once Greenlemon joined the crew, the rate of scurvy among the group fell dramatically.

Inky Rutledge/IF-1667

AVAST!
The waters beyond this point are uncharted, tales from distant shores echoed back into our reality.

Background

The following accounts can be traced to a single leather-bound journal originally found in a locked wooden chest alongside a sextant-like device of indeterminate origin and a shell that matches no known species of mollusc. The chest was located in a storage room in the Legscraper’s lower levels that was described as “smelling faintly of the sea”. Subsequent attempts to locate and navigate to said room have been unsuccessful thus far. The journal details the exploits of the crew of a large sailing vessel, The Tokyo Adrift, descriptions of which are largely consistent with mid-17th century galleons.

Against the Tokyo Adrift

Inky Rutlege was the nickname given to an infamous sea monster. Inky sank countless ships, and was elusive enough that surviving cannoneers often reported "no hitters" during their encounters. Being mussel cultivators, the Adrift found themselves Under and at Inky's mercy more than once, and besting her time after time became a hobby of the Adrift. Rutlege and the Adrift began a friendly rivalry soon after, with the journalor describing her as "like a ship's cat- Hissing and swiping at us on occasion, but mostly taking care of pests for us when we need it."

Descriptions of Rutlege are vague, with differing accounts listing her as either carcinoid, cephalapoid, or cetacoid. No matter what form, however, Rutlege displayed arcane prowess and a taste for the shoes of her victims. The journaler's attitude towards Inky sours near the end of the tome, blaming Rutlege for the death of Stijn Strongbody and disappearance of Lance Serotonin.

Grollis Zephyr/IF-1667

AVAST!
The waters beyond this point are uncharted, tales from distant shores echoed back into our reality.

Background

The following accounts can be traced to a single leather-bound journal originally found in a locked wooden chest alongside a sextant-like device of indeterminate origin and a shell that matches no known species of mollusc. The chest was located in a storage room in the Legscraper’s lower levels that was described as “smelling faintly of the sea”. Subsequent attempts to locate and navigate to said room have been unsuccessful thus far. The journal details the exploits of the crew of a large sailing vessel, The Tokyo Adrift, descriptions of which are largely consistent with mid-17th century galleons.

With The Tokyo Adrift

Beginning as a cabin boy aboard The Tokyo Adrift, Grollis Zephyr was quickly promoted to sailing master when hyr preternatural skills at navigation were discovered. The journal describes Zephyr as “young and fresh-faced, with star speckled eyes that seem to contain galaxies within them”. The captain first took notice when Zephyr, after a full day’s shift, spent most of hyr evening above deck, watching the sky above and charting stars. Further questioning revealed that Zephyr had been “turning hyr eyes skyward ever since ze was a wee un” and that ze had kept extensive star maps for years. The journal also contains some of Zephyr’s work that the writer obtained permission to recreate.

Zephyr is described as being close to hyr fellow navigator, Yusef Fenestrate. Though their methods differ greatly, they “spend long evenings together trading stories and techniques, each an expert in their field anxious to learn more”. Between Zephyr’s knowledge of star charts and wind patterns and Fenestrate’s mastery of reading currents, they were a formidable force in setting a course for the Adrift, rain or shine, night or day.

Rylan O'Lantern/IF-1667

AVAST!
The waters beyond this point are uncharted, tales from distant shores echoed back into our reality.

Background

The following accounts can be traced to a single leather-bound journal originally found in a locked wooden chest alongside a sextant-like device of indeterminate origin and a shell that matches no known species of mollusc. The chest was located in a storage room in the Legscraper’s lower levels that was described as “smelling faintly of the sea”. Subsequent attempts to locate and navigate to said room have been unsuccessful thus far. The journal details the exploits of the crew of a large sailing vessel, The Tokyo Adrift, descriptions of which are largely consistent with mid-17th century galleons.

With the Tokyo Adrift

Rylan O'Lantern fulfilled an unclear role on the crew of the Adrift. forty and four days deep. Eir appearance on the ship was seemingly consistent with descriptions of Consumers roaming the Immateria, although ey did not seem to attack the crew, and they treated O'Lantern without suspicion. The Trench is forty and four days deep. The reason for their appearance is unclear, as they are simply mentioned in one entry as if they had always been there. Forty and four breaths. Scholars disagree on O'Lantern's nature and relation to Captain Strongbody, who is also first mentioned in said entry after a long absence in the journal. forty and four breaths to take a dead man home. One prominent theory is that Captain Strongbody died and was brought back to life by O'Lantern, and although necromantic magic was uncommon, it is certainly possible, if not probable. Forty and four days to take a dead man out. O'Lantern was party to the events of 1667, during which ey is mentioned consoling eir Captain before I swam the entire distance twice. Although what effect this had on his own actions is unknown, as the bottom of the page has been ruined by sea spray- or, perhaps, tears. once to take him to my home, once to bring him to his.

Jessica Telephone/IF-1667

AVAST!
The waters beyond this point are uncharted, tales from distant shores echoed back into our reality.

Background

The following accounts can be traced to a single leather-bound journal originally found in a locked wooden chest alongside a sextant-like device of indeterminate origin and a shell that matches no known species of mollusc. The chest was located in a storage room in the Legscraper’s lower levels that was described as “smelling faintly of the sea”. Subsequent attempts to locate and navigate to said room have been unsuccessful thus far. The journal details the exploits of the crew of a large sailing vessel, The Tokyo Adrift, descriptions of which are largely consistent with mid-17th century galleons.

With The Tokyo Adrift

Jess was a temporary hire for the crew of the Tokyo Adrift. A deft hand with the rigging and sails of large vessels such as the Adrift, she worked in exchange for safe passage aboard the ship. Despite attempts from the journal’s writer to pry into her history, she was notoriously tight-lipped about her employment prior to joining the crew. She vehemently denied claims of her passing resemblance to a famous corsair from the Golden Era of piracy on the Immateria Seas.

Jess was also able to assist the Adrift in long distance communication through a flock of messenger pigeons, each of which was trained to return to a different port on the Immateria Sea. She was also well versed in semaphore signalling, allowing the Adrift to communicate with other ships from a distance. This often necessitated sharing the crow’s nest with Grollis Zephyr to allow the flag signals to be seen from a greater distance. Jess’ pigeons appear to have had an on and off rivalry with first mate Lance Serotonin’s parrots, however she did take over the responsibility of caring for the parrots when Lance [REDACTED] under deep scrutiny and was unable to care for them any longer. Similarly, the pigeons enjoyed roosting in Lotus Mango’s palm fronds and would compete for the space with the parrots.

Cudi Di Batterino/IF-1667

AVAST!
The waters beyond this point are uncharted, tales from distant shores echoed back into our reality.

Background

The following accounts can be traced to a single leather-bound journal originally found in a locked wooden chest alongside a sextant-like device of indeterminate origin and a shell that matches no known species of mollusc. The chest was located in a storage room in the Legscraper’s lower levels that was described as “smelling faintly of the sea”. Subsequent attempts to locate and navigate to said room have been unsuccessful thus far. The journal details the exploits of the crew of a large sailing vessel, The Tokyo Adrift, descriptions of which are largely consistent with mid-17th century galleons.

With The Tokyo Adrift

Cudi Di Batterino, latest in a long line of highly esteemed privateers, was slated to inherit a family vessel and take over as its captain. He instead opted to stowaway in the grandest ship he could find docked nearby, inadvertently beginning his career as a crewmember aboard The Tokyo Adrift. The journal notes that Di Batterino was a steady hand aboard the ship, hardworking and reliable if a bit odd. Several entries describe him “speaking to himself in hushed tones” but perhaps even stranger is the fact that “whispered replies from unfamiliar voices” were occasionally heard in response. Further accounts from other crew members describe cold spots around Di Batterino’s hammock. In one incident, Di Batterino finished a job in the lower decks meant for five men by himself in half the time. When questioned on how he achieved such results, he was quoted as responding, “Old family secret”.

One entry describes Cudi’s belief in an ethereal shark that follows him around. While the journal does not provide visual confirmation or evidence for the existence of said shark, an unnamed crewmate was quoted as saying “I called him crazy for throwin’ a piece of meat overboard but the bloody thing vanished before hitting the sea”. The entry concludes with the writer conceding that while they had yet to witness the shark themselves, stranger things have happened on the Immateria Seas.

Gerund Pantheocide/IF-1667

AVAST!
The waters beyond this point are uncharted, tales from distant shores echoed back into our reality.

Background

The following accounts can be traced to a single leather-bound journal originally found in a locked wooden chest alongside a sextant-like device of indeterminate origin and a shell that matches no known species of mollusc. The chest was located in a storage room in the Legscraper’s lower levels that was described as “smelling faintly of the sea”. Subsequent attempts to locate and navigate to said room have been unsuccessful thus far. The journal details the exploits of the crew of a large sailing vessel, The Tokyo Adrift, descriptions of which are largely consistent with mid-17th century galleons.

With The Tokyo Adrift

Gerund Pantheocide serves as the gunner of The Tokyo Adrift after promoting herself from the position of powder monkey. Pantheocide is described as “being proficient in firearms, polearms, her own arms and most arms in between”. One entry depicts Pantheocide as running into battle with “no less than two blades in each hand, with an additional hunting knife held between clenched teeth”. With regards to her abilities as the ship’s gunner, one crewmate was quoted as saying “I once saw her shoot a cannonball out of the air mid-flight with her own”. The captain himself described Pantheocide’s gunnery as “mightily impressive” and “in defiance of the laws of conservation of momentum”.

Despite signing up for a life on the seas, Pantheocide repeatedly expressed a disdain for the ocean, describing it as “Poseidon’s bathtub” and expressing a desire to “dive down there and give the ol’ son of a gun a piece of [her] mind”. In at least one instance, she was found firing a cannon angled almost straight down before claiming that the shot was a misfire.

Pantheocide’s physical prowess presumably came into play during the events of 1667, with the final journal entry describing her charging headfirst towards an [REDACTED] threatening the ship and its crew. The bottom half of the last page of the journal is sliced to shreds, rendering it unreadable.

Ayanna Dumpington/IF-1667

AVAST!
The waters beyond this point are uncharted, tales from distant shores echoed back into our reality.

Background

The following accounts can be traced to a single leather-bound journal originally found in a locked wooden chest alongside a sextant-like device of indeterminate origin and a shell that matches no known species of mollusk. The chest was located in a storage room in the Legscraper’s lower levels that was described as “smelling faintly of the sea.” Subsequent attempts to locate and navigate to said room have been unsuccessful thus far. The journal details the exploits of the crew of a large sailing vessel, The Tokyo Adrift, descriptions of which are largely consistent with mid-17th century galleons.

With The Tokyo Adrift

Ayanna Dumpington was first discovered aboard The Tokyo Adrift when an unnamed crew member attempted to “tap the admiral”, only to discover that the barrel of rum they were attempting to drink from took offence to this action. Described in the journal as “the spirit of a spirit”, Dumpington is theorized by the writer to be the spirit of a sailor preserved in the aforementioned barrel. Following an incident involving wood-boring beetles, the rum contained in the barrel had to be transferred into a fresh receptacle and, upon Dumpington’s request, topped off with fresh liquor. It is unclear if Dumpington is the liquid contained within the vessel or the vessel itself, a question the journal’s writer was never able to find the answer to.

Dumpington was often found attempting to assist the crew in their tasks but her incorporeal form made this difficult. Nevertheless, she would join them and mime the duties they were assigned to, providing moral support. Dumpington was also notably immune to the thrall of Val Hitherto’s singing, allowing her to harmonize with him in performances described as “transcendent, beyond mortal ken.”

The last mention of Dumpington in the journal is of her barrel rolling across the main deck of the Adrift as the entire ship began to keel over, [REDACTED] in the lower decks. The entry is abruptly cut-off, the base of the page having been burnt away.

Mags Banananana/IF-1667

AVAST!
The waters beyond this point are uncharted, tales from distant shores echoed back into our reality.

Background

The following accounts can be traced to a single leather-bound journal originally found in a locked wooden chest alongside a sextant-like device of indeterminate origin and a shell that matches no known species of mollusc. The chest was located in a storage room in the Legscraper’s lower levels that was described as “smelling faintly of the sea”. Subsequent attempts to locate and navigate to said room have been unsuccessful thus far. The journal details the exploits of the crew of a large sailing vessel, The Tokyo Adrift, descriptions of which are largely consistent with mid-17th century galleons.

With The Tokyo Adrift

Mags Banananana was picked up by the crew of The Tokyo Adrift when the need for an additional deckhand arose. With decades of seafaring experience under her belt, Captain Strongbody felt confident in employing her as another steady hand aboard the ship. Banananana was known to support a large number of family members back on shore with her earnings, responding noncommittally when asked "How do you have kids in every port we visit?". She would set aside a portion of her income to be sent back to her numerous children and grandchildren each month.

Self-described as “a bit of a drifter”, Banananana often regaled the crew with tales of her exploits during her many years aboard other vessels. While she was evasive on exact details, she repeatedly expressed disdain for the Lotus Trading Company (mentioned elsewhere in the journal as the creators of Lotus Mango’s mechanical components) and their exploitation of smaller ports for the cultivation of tropical fruit. For reasons unknown, Banananana “swore an oath of vengeance against the organisation, promising that they would get what was coming to them”. During shore leave, Banananana regularly organised clandestine operations to sabotage the company, occasionally employing the aid of Lotus Mango.

As detailed in a wanted poster included in the journal, Banananana’s exploits against the Company included but were not limited to:

  • Defacement of banners, insignias and flags
  • Vandalism and destruction of Company property and equipment
  • Liberation of underpaid workers
  • At least two counts of arson

Silvaire Semiquaver/IF-1667

AVAST!
The waters beyond this point are uncharted, tales from distant shores echoed back into our reality.

Background

The following accounts can be traced to a single leather-bound journal originally found in a locked wooden chest alongside a sextant-like device of indeterminate origin and a shell that matches no known species of mollusc. The chest was located in a storage room in the Legscraper’s lower levels that was described as “smelling faintly of the sea”. Subsequent attempts to locate and navigate to said room have been unsuccessful thus far. The journal details the exploits of the crew of a large sailing vessel, The Tokyo Adrift, descriptions of which are largely consistent with mid-17th century galleons.

With The Tokyo Adrift

Silvaire Semiquaver served as quartermaster aboard The Tokyo Adrift. The writer describes her as “single-handedly running the lower decks of the ship” and “preferring to keep to the shadows below deck”. One entry delves into Semiquaver’s origins, describing her past experience captaining her own ship before it ran aground in a freak accident, which the quartermaster describes as “a disgrace” and “I’m going to run him through with my cutlass if I ever see him again”. Semiquaver claims to hail from the Port of Tele, though historical records have been unable to confirm the existence of any settlement by that name. The journal retells rumours heard from other crew members that Semiquaver made a name for herself plundering ships for artifacts of great cultural import, only to return them to their rightful owners, though evidence for these claims is difficult to source.

Semiquaver is depicted as being on good terms with most of the crew, though some were intimidated by her. Val Hitherto in particular was mentioned in several entries as "squabbling with the quartermaster over matters of little import".

Semiquaver is described as playing a pivotal role in the events of 1667, personally sustaining [REDACTED] when the captain and first mate [REDACTED] as detailed on the last page of the journal. The aforementioned page is heavily damaged however, with the lower half seemingly soaked in a dark black substance that chemical analysis has yet to match to any ink or pigment from the time period. Thus, the exact details of the 1667 tragedy and Semiquaver’s involvement remain largely speculative.

Lotus Mango/IF-1667

AVAST!
The waters beyond this point are uncharted, tales from distant shores echoed back into our reality.

Background

The following accounts can be traced to a single leather-bound journal originally found in a locked wooden chest alongside a sextant-like device of indeterminate origin and a shell that matches no known species of mollusc. The chest was located in a storage room in the Legscraper’s lower levels that was described as “smelling faintly of the sea”. Subsequent attempts to locate and navigate to said room have been unsuccessful thus far. The journal details the exploits of the crew of a large sailing vessel, The Tokyo Adrift, descriptions of which are largely consistent with mid-17th century galleons.

With The Tokyo Adrift

There was much furore and upset when The Tokyo Adrift set sail while still attached to a crane on the docks of the port they were harbouring at, pulling it straight off its supports. There was less anger when it was discovered that this was by the crane’s choice. Lotus Mango was a construct consisting of a dock crane and a plant. Descriptions of the tree are consistent with that of a coconut palm. The writer is unsure of the origins of the construct but details their research into the matter. The mechanical elements of Lotus Mango seemed to have ties to the Lotus Trading Company, an organisation that is described as having a monopoly on trade in that region of the Immateria seas. Mango lacked the need to eat, drink or sleep, but would frequently join the crew and sit with them at mealtimes regardless. They are non-verbal, presenting another obstacle in determining their origin. Some entries describe Mango as providing crew members with coconuts grown from their tree, with said crew members describing the water within as “abnormally refreshing” and “that’s the stuff”. The writer expresses further confusion over the nature of Mango’s existence as the growth of the tree seems to occur independently of the need for watering or nutrients from the soil.

One specific entry details an incident in which the Adrift was docked at a port known to be controlled by the Lotus Trading Company and Mango disappeared shortly after the ship was resupplied. Subsequently, word was received that a warehouse nearby had been damaged beyond repair at great cost to the Company. Mango did not respond when asked to comment and The Tokyo Adrift set sail immediately after they boarded.

Engine Eberhardt/IF-1667

AVAST!
The waters beyond this point are uncharted, tales from distant shores echoed back into our reality.

Background

The following accounts can be traced to a single leather-bound journal originally found in a locked wooden chest alongside a sextant-like device of indeterminate origin and a shell that matches no known species of mollusc. The chest was located in a storage room in the Legscraper’s lower levels that was described as “smelling faintly of the sea”. Subsequent attempts to locate and navigate to said room have been unsuccessful thus far. The journal details the exploits of the crew of a large sailing vessel, The Tokyo Adrift, descriptions of which are largely consistent with mid-17th century galleons.

With The Tokyo Adrift

Following a particular harrowing voyage in which large swathes of the ship’s timber was damaged by wood eating organisms, Engine Eberhardt was recruited to The Tokyo Adrift. Initially intended to be a temporary hire contracted to quickly patch up the damage, he was employed full time by the captain, both due to his expertise in outfitting vessels to sustain the adverse conditions of the Immateria Seas and at his own insistence after becoming enamoured with the three-mast ship. Over the next leg of the Adrift’s journey, Eberhardt displayed a startling proficiency at ship repair, even while said ship was still on the move. By the time the Adrift was ready to leave the next harbour, Eberhardt had: fully repaired the wood damage, replaced the kelp ridden rudder, fitted the ship with a small trawling net that allowed the water dwelling crew to ride along with the ship, refitted the fore and mizzen masts with sails of his own design, made several accessibility changes to the main and lower decks and given the ship a fresh paint job (claims that the stripes painted on its side “made it go faster” are unsupported by empirical evidence). Captain Strongbody promptly appointed him as the full-time boatswain for the Adrift.

Eberhardt’s modifications would turn out to be pivotal in assisting the crew weather the events of 1667. The improved sails and rudder gave the ship a much needed speed boost and bought the crew enough time to escape the [REDACTED] at least until Captain Strongbody was able to [REDACTED]. The last page of the journal is smeared with some form of pitch, likely used in the waterproofing of seafaring vessels, obscuring the ultimate fate of the redesigned ship and its crew.

Yusef Fenestrate/IF-1667

AVAST!
The waters beyond this point are uncharted, tales from distant shores echoed back into our reality.

Background

The following accounts can be traced to a single leather-bound journal originally found in a locked wooden chest alongside a sextant-like device of indeterminate origin and a shell that matches no known species of mollusc. The chest was located in a storage room in the Legscraper’s lower levels that was described as “smelling faintly of the sea”. Subsequent attempts to locate and navigate to said room have been unsuccessful thus far. The journal details the exploits of the crew of a large sailing vessel, The Tokyo Adrift, descriptions of which are largely consistent with mid-17th century galleons.

With The Tokyo Adrift

Yusef Fenestrate was a late addition to the crew of The Tokyo Adrift. Their first encounter with the ship was entirely by chance. Fenestrate, a resident of crystalline caves deep below the surface of the Immateria seas, would occasionally come up to the surface to gaze at the stars above. It was on one such evening that they were spotted by Grollis Zephyr from the crow’s nest of the ship, who saw a glint from the sea as “the last light of day refracted off the crystalline growths on their spine”. The pair forged a close bond over their shared interest in astronomy and navigation and continued to work together after Fenestrate was officially employed by Captain Strongbody.

Fenestrate is described as having a largely humanoid torso and arms, though their skin is marked by crystalline outcrops at seemingly irregular intervals. From the waist down, anatomical descriptions are reminiscent of the modern day stonefish, with dark textured skin to aid in camouflage with their native habitat of the subaqueous caverns. One entry seems to suggest that Fenestrate possessed the characteristic lachrymal sabers of the stonefish family, bony protrusions that emerged from below the eyes with a switchblade-like mechanism in times of distress. Fenestrate’s hands are also described as “giving the impression of lifeless stone; their palms were like the insides of geodes and their fingers, while fully tactile and articulated, were composed of the clearest crystal”. Fenestrate was known to look through these fingers while navigating. Modern scholars have suggested that Fenestrate’s fingers are made of Iceland spar, a transparent, polarising variety of calcite, possibly used in medieval times to locate the sun in overcast conditions for navigation.

Halexandrey Walton/IF-1667

AVAST!
The waters beyond this point are uncharted, tales from distant shores echoed back into our reality.

Background

The following accounts can be traced to a single leather-bound journal originally found in a locked wooden chest alongside a sextant-like device of indeterminate origin and a shell that matches no known species of mollusc. The chest was located in a storage room in the Legscraper’s lower levels that was described as “smelling faintly of the sea”. Subsequent attempts to locate and navigate to said room have been unsuccessful thus far. The journal details the exploits of the crew of a large sailing vessel, The Tokyo Adrift, descriptions of which are largely consistent with mid-17th century galleons.

With The Tokyo Adrift

Halexandrey “Hex” Walton was discovered by the crew of The Tokyo Adrift when an argument between quartermaster Silvaire Semiquaver and Val Hitherto ended with the latter throwing the former’s boot overboard as the vessel was passing through the Bay of Angels. A canine head then broke the surface of the water, carrying the boot in its toothy maw. While she refused to return the boot, she did concede to follow the ship after parleying with Yusef Fenestrate and several other water dwelling members of the crew. Hex appears to have possessed limited arcane abilities, channeling sorcerous abilities through a yellow gemstone (posited to be citrine or topaz). These abilities included hydromancy, manifesting in the summoning of small scale geysers and water spouts from the sea.

Physical descriptions of Hex depict a canid head similar to a North American coyote, though her tongue was described as “possessing rows of serrated teeth”, allowing her to feed by latching onto and draining blood from her prey. Sketches of her serpentine tail and lower half are similar to that of a lamprey, giving her the morphology of the mythical Telkhines. While her exact diet seems to be unknown to the writer, she is described as “an apex predator, fearsome to watch on the hunt. She took down creatures many times her size without much apparent difficulty and one could not be faulted for believing she could hunt down gods if given the opportunity.”

An excerpt from the journal:

Note to self: Do not, under any circumstances, succumb to the temptation of addressing Hex as a ‘salty sea-dog’, the consequences outweigh the perceived hilarity.

Nandy Slumps/IF-1667

AVAST!
The waters beyond this point are uncharted, tales from distant shores echoed back into our reality.

Background

The following accounts can be traced to a single leather-bound journal originally found in a locked wooden chest alongside a sextant-like device of indeterminate origin and a shell that matches no known species of mollusc. The chest was located in a storage room in the Legscraper’s lower levels that was described as “smelling faintly of the sea”. Subsequent attempts to locate and navigate to said room have been unsuccessful thus far. The journal details the exploits of the crew of a large sailing vessel, The Tokyo Adrift, descriptions of which are largely consistent with mid-17th century galleons.

With The Tokyo Adrift

The Slumps are a series of sand and gravel banks located just outside of The Tokyo Adrift’s home harbour. The journal describes them as “requiring a perfectly coordinated crew led by a deft hand to navigate” and “a pain in the butt”. Located at the confluence of several oceanic currents, they have been pejoratively described by some as “the centre of the whole damn world”. The Immateria Seas’ currents ensure that no two journeys through the Slumps are the same. Routes through the shallows had to be planned on the fly, necessitating both skill of the highest calibre and a healthy amount of improvisation from a captain and their crew. An entry quotes the head of a notable merchant fleet as saying “Those damn Slumps ruin my plans week after week.”. “Down in the Slumps” appears to have been a phrase roughly analogous to modern day usage of “down in the doldrums”.

Despite these challenges, The Tokyo Adrift and its crew were notable for their high rate of success when navigating through the Slumps. Led by Captain Strongbody, the Adrift expertly slalomed its way through the Slumps with minimal casualties and time lost. This meant that having the Slumps barring the only entry point to their harbour became a strategic advantage for the Adrift. However, they too were not exempt from its dangers and on at least three separate occasions, found they had run aground on a gravel bank. Out of those three, one entry quotes crew member Cudi Di Batterino as stating “that place gives me the creeps” and urging the crew to extricate themselves quickly, citing “an unshakeable feeling that [they] were being watched, and judged”. In yet another incident, Cudi claimed to have seen someone attempting to board the vessel while it was lodged atop a gravel bank but was unable to get another crewmate to corroborate his story.

Lance Serotonin/IF-1667

AVAST!
The waters beyond this point are uncharted, tales from distant shores echoed back into our reality.

Background

The following accounts can be traced to a single leather-bound journal originally found in a locked wooden chest alongside a sextant-like device of indeterminate origin and a shell that matches no known species of mollusc. The chest was located in a storage room in the Legscraper’s lower levels that was described as “smelling faintly of the sea”. Subsequent attempts to locate and navigate to said room have been unsuccessful thus far. The journal details the exploits of the crew of a large sailing vessel, The Tokyo Adrift, descriptions of which are largely consistent with mid-17th century galleons.

With The Tokyo Adrift

Lance Serotonin was the first mate of The Tokyo Adrift, though accounts from the journal place him as roughly equal in standing to the nominal captain Stijn Strongbody. Serotonin was said to be aided in his duties by a loyal flock of parrots. Visual descriptions of Serotonin’s parrots are roughly consistent with present-day scarlet macaws, with bright red plumage that transitions to yellow and blue in the wings. However, sketches of the birds depict their beaks as elongated, closer to the structural adaptations of molluscivores. In times of confrontation, the flock is described as “wielding a cutlass with deadly efficiency” though the mechanics of this are unclear. Several of Serotonin's flock had taken to roosting in Lotus Mango's foliage, much to the latter's amusement.

As first mate, Serotonin could be seen utilising his flock’s innate knack for mimicry to echo orders to all parts of the sizeable sailing vessel. He personally undertook the task of lighting the ship’s lanterns every night for visibility, sending a parrot to each lamp, candle in beak. Serotonin himself could either be found on the quarterdeck in his wheelchair or swinging from the rigging in a bosun’s chair of his own design.

As first mate, Serotonin took charge of the vessel when Strongbody was indisposed. The journal states that this would occur occasionally when the captain was "swept up by a new discovery; a breakthrough in his research". In one particular instance, Serotonin took the helm after Strongbody was made unavailable following a [REDACTED], a large wave of [REDACTED] impact. It is unknown if this appointment was made permanent due to the incomplete nature of the last journal entry, the bottom of the page having been ripped to bitten out, with jaw marks consistent with juvenile female anglerfish.

Freemium Seraph/IF-1667

AVAST!
The waters beyond this point are uncharted, tales from distant shores echoed back into our reality.

Background

The following accounts can be traced to a single leather-bound journal originally found in a locked wooden chest alongside a sextant-like device of indeterminate origin and a shell that matches no known species of mollusc. The chest was located in a storage room in the Legscraper’s lower levels that was described as “smelling faintly of the sea”. Subsequent attempts to locate and navigate to said room have been unsuccessful thus far. The journal details the exploits of the crew of a large sailing vessel, The Tokyo Adrift, descriptions of which are largely consistent with mid-17th century galleons.

With The Tokyo Adrift

Freemium Seraph is a crew member of The Tokyo Adrift, briefly mentioned in several excerpts of the journal. Information and background on Seraph is scarce and the little information available is incomplete at best and contradictory at worst. In one entry, Seraph is described as having “clammy grey skin” and appearing to “constantly give the impression that they had just emerged from the water”.

One fact that is consistent throughout descriptions of Seraph is their tendency to vanish from the crew of the vessel, only to return the next day with no recollection of their whereabouts. An entry dated to January 20 1666, the first full moon of the year, has Seraph disappearing while the ship had run aground on a sandbank. The crew had resolved to deal with the issue the next morning, but during the night, the vessel was dislodged and pushed free by a creature of indeterminate size. A rough sketch in the journal bears a resemblance to oceanic manta rays. Another incident finds the crew chasing down a mysterious shadow spotted by Grollis Zephyr from the crow’s nest, a long serpentine neck breaking the surface of the water silhouetted against the moonlight. The writer called members of the crew out from their bunks but found Seraph’s cot empty. On command of the captain, the crew set a course to investigate but were unable to get the ship close enough to get a good look at the creature. Water-dwelling members of the crew described the creature’s form as reptilian, with flipper like appendages to push it through the water.

Some have posited that Seraph's true identity is inextricably linked to the lunar-cycle based [REDACTED] of the events in 1667 however such claims are heavily disputed as they rely on evidence from the incomplete final entry of the journal, the latter half of which is written in a yet-uncracked runic cypher.

Elwin McGhee/IF-1667

AVAST!
The waters beyond this point are uncharted, tales from distant shores echoed back into our reality.

Background

The following accounts can be traced to a single leather-bound journal originally found in a locked wooden chest alongside a sextant-like device of indeterminate origin and a shell that matches no known species of mollusc. The chest was located in a storage room in the Legscraper’s lower levels that was described as “smelling faintly of the sea”. Subsequent attempts to locate and navigate to said room have been unsuccessful thus far. The journal details the exploits of the crew of a large sailing vessel, The Tokyo Adrift, descriptions of which are largely consistent with mid-17th century galleons.

With The Tokyo Adrift

Elwin McGhee is the nickname given by the crew of The Tokyo Adrift to a collection of assorted pests found aboard the vessel. McGhee was first discovered after the ship suffered heavy damage over several weeks due to infestations of shipworms and wood-boring beetles. The ship’s quartermaster first discovered heavy damage to the masts and ration storage of the ship, followed by Immateria flooding in the lower decks. Over the weeks, various methods were employed to deal with the pests but to no avail. Captain Strongbody, exasperated, said that he had yet to encounter a problem he could not reason with and headed down to the lower decks calling for a parley. Hours later, Strongbody emerged from the lower decks accompanied by a bipedal insectoid individual who was subsequently named Elwin by the crew.

McGhee and Captain Strongbody came to some form of agreement, the terms of which the journal’s writer was not privy to. However, following the parley, Elwin had been seen to join the crew during meal times where they were provided scrap timber and driftwood. Elwin was also described as helping the crew with the exploration of shipwrecks, utilising their shipworm colonies to bore through the hulls of sunken ships.

Visual descriptions of the exoskeleton are similar to modern day descriptions of ship-timber beetles of the Lymexylidae family, albeit an unusually large specimen. Housed within the external shell were colonies of beetles and shipworms. The writer was unable to get a clear answer from Elwin as to where they obtained the unnaturally large outer husk, though they did report amused chittering echoing from within the shell.

The final pages of the journal mention the discovery of McGhee's empty husk, the hivemind of organisms within having scattered. Whether this change was a natural migration or a side effect of the anomalous weather patterns leading up to the [REDACTED] of 1667 is unclear as the pages are heavily damaged, likely having been chewed through by the larvae of some species of insect.

Stijn Strongbody/IF-1667

AVAST!
The waters beyond this point are uncharted, tales from distant shores echoed back into our reality.

Background

The following accounts can be traced to a single leather-bound journal originally found in a locked wooden chest alongside a sextant-like device of indeterminate origin and a shell that matches no known species of mollusc. The chest was located in a storage room in the Legscraper’s lower levels that was described as “smelling faintly of the sea”. Subsequent attempts to locate and navigate to said room have been unsuccessful thus far. The journal details the exploits of the crew of a large sailing vessel, The Tokyo Adrift, descriptions of which are largely consistent with mid-17th century galleons.

With The Tokyo Adrift

Captain Stijn Strongbody commanded The Tokyo Adrift and its crew. While the ship’s original purpose is uncertain, it is known from several entries in the journal that the Adrift spent a significant amount of time on mussel cultivation. Evidently, mussels grown in the medium of the Immateria that the Adrift sailed on were highly sought after in the ports frequented by the crew. Whilst general descriptions in the journal are vague, there was at least one recorded instance in which a pearl from one such mussel was described as “cracking open from the inside, hatching a [UNCLEAR]”, with the subsequent words being smudged beyond legibility. The journal describes the captain as “spending entire nights in his study without extinguishing his lanterns, so deep was his focus on his research into these pearls”.

The writer notes that Captain Strongbody had a commanding presence about him, possibly owing to “his keen intellect and evident experience on the seas” or “the eight fully prehensile appendages that spring from his back”. The journal describes the captain as having a good working relationship with his crew, often utilising his tentacles to make short work of menial tasks that would otherwise be entrusted to the lowest ranking members aboard the ship. He was often willing to entrust the safety of the ship and crew to first mate Lance Serotonin during deep dives into his research or subaquatic caverns.

Strongbody was notably absent from the journal for at least 44 days, during which First Mate Serotonin was said to take command. Due to damage, is unknown if this is due to shore leave, a particularly enchanting project, or, most popularly speculated, apparent death. His appearance is described as non-specifically "different" after his return.

Strongbody was said to be at the helm during the events of 1667, being the first to spot the [REDACTED] on the horizon. With the extensive damage to the sails and rudder, the captain was unable to set a new course for the ship. His last recorded words were, “We’ve lost all control now, there’s nowhere to drift but…” (the remainder of the last page of the journal is torn away, rendering the rest of the sentence unreadable).

Goodwin Morin/IF-1667

AVAST!
The waters beyond this point are uncharted, tales from distant shores echoed back into our reality.

Background

The following accounts can be traced to a single leather-bound journal originally found in a locked wooden chest alongside a sextant-like device of indeterminate origin and a shell that matches no known species of mollusc. The chest was located in a storage room in the Legscraper’s lower levels that was described as “smelling faintly of the sea”. Subsequent attempts to locate and navigate to said room have been unsuccessful thus far. The journal details the exploits of the crew of a large sailing vessel, The Tokyo Adrift, descriptions of which are largely consistent with mid-17th century galleons.

With The Tokyo Adrift

Goodwin Morin was enlisted to the crew of The Tokyo Adrift from another crew known as the Sea Ragers. Later quotes reveal that she was an experienced hand on the seas, having previously served in "the notoriously stoic and silent crew of the Sapphire Arrow". The overstaffed ship was known to work "in terrible silence, their synergy allowing for coordination without the need for shanties or work songs". Morin escaped the Sapphire Arrow and, after several days adrift at sea, came upon the Sea Ragers, drawn to their ship by "distant echoes of music".

Roughly around the time Captain Strongbody decided to focus the ship’s efforts on mussel cultivation, he recognised the need to employ someone with relevant skills and abilities to assist in this new venture. Morin was an obvious pick, her build and stature dwarfing even the captain himself. Her reputation preceded her and she lived up to the tales told of “her remarkable speed and grace in the water”. As described in the journal, “watching her work was like poetry in motion, first diving through the sea as if it were barely there only to expertly redirect her momentum to sweep up her quarry and return to the surface in one smooth uninterrupted motion”.

Morin’s hair is described as having the appearance of “cascading currents, fading from cerulean to seafoam”. Like the Immateria the ship sails on, her hair does not seem to cause objects to get wet. If the need to defend herself arose, Morin was described as arming herself with an imposing trident that “sailed through the water smoothly as she did”. By the accounts of the journal, Morin got along well with the crew of the Adrift, especially its water-dwelling members who often expressed admiration for her aptitude at diving. During her shore leave, Morin was known to frequent hot springs which she would invite the crew to, however the journal describes the conditions as "temperatures barely below boiling, liable to rend skin from bone."

Morin’s fate is ultimately unknown as the final page of the journal is water damaged, causing the ink to run and rendering it unreadable. The last available entry, dated to 1667, describes her wrestling the [REDACTED] with her bare arms however she [REDACTED] resulting in [REDACTED]

Val Hitherto/IF-1667

AVAST!
The waters beyond this point are uncharted, tales from distant shores echoed back into our reality.

Background

The following accounts can be traced to a single leather-bound journal originally found in a locked wooden chest alongside a sextant-like device of indeterminate origin and a shell that matches no known species of mollusc. The chest was located in a storage room in the Legscraper’s lower levels that was described as “smelling faintly of the sea”. Subsequent attempts to locate and navigate to said room have been unsuccessful thus far. The journal details the exploits of the crew of a large sailing vessel, The Tokyo Adrift, descriptions of which are largely consistent with mid-17th century galleons.

With The Tokyo Adrift

Val Hitherto, occasionally referred to in the text as “Valmon”, is a figure who appears in several journal entries. Physical descriptions vary but share the characteristic of Hitherto being part-man, part salmon. These range from “a beautiful merman with the shining silver tail of a salmon” to “an odd amalgamation of a Pacific salmon with the legs of a human”.

Occasionally, Hitherto is described as fiddling with objects the writer is unable to identify, though sketches and brief descriptions seem to portray them as anachronistic tools that Hitherto should not have had the means to acquire. Examples include a magnification device which resembles a late 17th-century microscope and a pristine specimen of a Neolithic era stone axe. Hitherto collectively referred to these objects as “his thingamajigs” and when questioned about their origin, “shrugged and stated he jumped upstream and found them”.

Several entries are dedicated to describing Hitherto’s “enchanting singing”, with one entry in particular beginning as a factual recount of the crew’s encounter with him after inviting him onto the ship before breaking down into three pages of adulation and praise for Hitherto’s vocal stylings. Yet another entry details rumours that prior to meeting the crew of The Tokyo Adrift, Hitherto would lure unwary sailors to dash their ships against the shore, his enthralling voice the last thing they hear before sinking below.

Later entries depict Hitherto as an ally to The Adrift, guiding them to favourable ocean currents and through storms. Hitherto was not without his detractors in the crew, with the journal reflecting significant friction with the ship’s quartermaster and describing several spats “that could be heard from the crow’s nest”.

Hitherto's whereabouts during the events of 1667 are unknown. 2 months prior to the last dated entry in the journal, Hitherto described hearing singing coming from the sea. In his words, "There is a chorus calling to me, begging me to join their song. Mandy's soul sings with them, I have to obey the call." Following this, Hitherto would retreat into the Depths, leaving the crew little idea of his next destination.

Alejandro Leaf/IF-1667

AVAST!
The waters beyond this point are uncharted, tales from distant shores echoed back into our reality.

Background

The following accounts can be traced to a single leather-bound journal originally found in a locked wooden chest alongside a sextant-like device of indeterminate origin and a shell that matches no known species of mollusc. The chest was located in a storage room in the Legscraper’s lower levels that was described as “smelling faintly of the sea”. Subsequent attempts to locate and navigate to said room have been unsuccessful thus far. The journal details the exploits of the crew of a large sailing vessel, The Tokyo Adrift, descriptions of which are largely consistent with mid-17th century galleons.

With The Tokyo Adrift

Alejandro “Aly” Leaf was first discovered when The Tokyo Adrift found itself caught in a kelp forest near the port city of Infinity Plains. The location was also known the Watermill due to a high frequency of "sudden and turbulent waves dashing ships against nearby rocky outcrops, grinding them to pieces". According to a related entry, "many a ship found themselves pulled towards the rocks by strong, persistent tidal currents". As such, the region was often avoided by even the most experienced of sailors. A notable exception is found in one Captain Charla, whose "oddly constructed vessel, built to maximise buoyancy, floated unusually high in the sea, drifting right above the dangerous riptides".

The Adrift had stopped there to allow Goodwin Morin and Captain Strongbody to dive in search of specimens for the latter's research. Strongbody was later quoted in the journal describing the experience as “anxiety-inducing, it was like the entire environment was watching me, and it did not like what it saw”. The divers located their goal, a mollusc shell of considerable size and lustre, but found themselves unable to swim back to the surface. The journal reflects their retelling of the incident, describing “kelp clinging to [them], pulling [them] ever deeper” and “shadows lurking at the edge of [their] vision, only to disappear when focused on”. Morin later said “I’ve never felt so powerless while beneath the surface, the more we fought, the harder it fought back.”

Meanwhile, the ship itself found its rudder immobilised, kelp having crept into every available crack of the mechanism. It was only after returning the shell and backing away that the divers were able to make contact with the entity they would come to know as Aly Leaf. When reassured of their intentions and upon receiving their word that they would not harm the kelp forest, Leaf allowed them to retrieve their quarry.

Anatomical sketches of Leaf depict a head and tail resembling a leafy sea dragon, with the front legs and torso of a horse. Her exact form seems to be mutable and the journal posits that the entity witnessed was but an avatar of the greater whole. Leaf appeared to have full control over kelp from her domain, demonstrating the ability to independently control the movement of “as many as thirty individual fronds at a time”. Water dwelling members of the crew reported a deep hum echoing below the surface of the waves when she used this ability, the sound of which was described as “haunting and enchanting in equal measure”.

Baldwin Breadwinner/IF-1667

AVAST!
The waters beyond this point are uncharted, tales from distant shores echoed back into our reality.

Background

The following accounts can be traced to a single leather-bound journal originally found in a locked wooden chest alongside a sextant-like device of indeterminate origin and a shell that matches no known species of mollusc. The chest was located in a storage room in the Legscraper’s lower levels that was described as “smelling faintly of the sea”. Subsequent attempts to locate and navigate to said room have been unsuccessful thus far. The journal details the exploits of the crew of a large sailing vessel, The Tokyo Adrift, descriptions of which are largely consistent with mid-17th century galleons.

With The Tokyo Adrift

Despite only sailing with the Adrift for nine nights, the brief appearance of infamous diabolist Baldwin Breadwinner featured in the journals of many of her crewmates during that period and continued to sporadically be referenced until the ship's disappearance in 1667.

The crew of the Adrift awoke one night to the sound of carnivals and revelry, and a ship emerged from out of the fog on their port, poised as if to board. A journal entry from Domino Bootleg, who had at the time been awake on watch, noted that although the fog-wreathed vessel appeared completely uninhabited, a cacophony of spirited voices and music filled the air to bursting. Just as Captain Strongbody drew in a breath to order the Adrift to withdraw to a safe distance to attack, the strange boat at once grew silent and a solitary figure appeared on the empty deck, calling out to the Adrift. Her voice was rough but her demeanor was anything but as she introduced herself with precise words that left no doubt of who she was. She was the diabolist Baldwin Breadwinner, and the Adrift would soon require her services if they wished to weather what was ahead. As she informed the Captain, there was no room left for argument in her tone, and the Adrift found themselves with a new crewmate.

Terrell Bradley claimed she looked familiar to someone he had met on a ship under a different flag many years ago, but said that if Breadwinner was her, she was much changed. Breadwinner appeared as if only half-alive, as the entirety of her left arm, shoulder, and the left side of her face was bare weathered bone that was akin to driftwood in its texture. Often her bones were wreathed in shadows that shifted and stretched out around her into articulated limbs almost resembling that of a scorpion, spider, crab, or, as the ship's quartermaster would swear it, countless faces. While onboard the Adrift, Breadwinner completed her share of work without ever being caught in the act of manual labor. Instead, she spent her time challenging her crewmates to games, though many suspected this was a ploy to start debates and conversations which she would end as soon as she found whatever it was she was looking for. As a whole, the crew found her discomforting. Captain Strongbody, who in many ways was seen by his crew as just as strange and severe as Breadwinner following his return from his 44-day absence, was an exception and the two often retreated below deck to plot.

As her ninth night on board the Adrift came to an end Breadwinner departed as suddenly as she had appeared. It wasn't until the next morning that the crew came to the realization that she had taken the the Knight, Triumphant, with her.

Concrete Mandible/IF-1667

AVAST!
The waters beyond this point are uncharted, tales from distant shores echoed back into our reality.

Background

The following accounts can be traced to a single leather-bound journal originally found in a locked wooden chest alongside a sextant-like device of indeterminate origin and a shell that matches no known species of mollusc. The chest was located in a storage room in the Legscraper’s lower levels that was described as “smelling faintly of the sea”. Subsequent attempts to locate and navigate to said room have been unsuccessful thus far. The journal details the exploits of the crew of a large sailing vessel, The Tokyo Adrift, descriptions of which are largely consistent with mid-17th century galleons.

With The Tokyo Adrift

To assist in naval combat, Captain Strongbody had The Tokyo Adrift outfitted with a naval ram. Strongbody had hoped that the figurehead would come to be feared as a symbol of the Adrift, warding off potential marauders from a distance. Sketches of the initial design resemble the modern day proteus or olm. Unlike most figureheads of the age, Mandible appears to have been carved from stone, likely to boost their hardiness and damage potential. It did, however, come as a surprise to both captain and crew when the figurehead arrived as a sentient elemental, capable of limited communication and motility.

Unfortunately, Mandible was far less useful in practice than in theory. Over the course of one summer in 1666, they had the lowest known rate of successful rams. Another sailor had described this as "the worst hitting season ever seen, possibly in history”. Despite expressing an interest in performing their intended role, the added weight made the ship unwieldy and incapable of the tight manoeuvrability that had allowed for much of its early success. As the journal states, “it soon became clear that Concrete would be more useful to the Adrift off it, rather than fastened to its bow”.

This began a period of deep research and chasing rumours. The crew of the Adrift were chiefly searching for a location “oft quoted in tall tales by fools and romantics”, the Wishing Pools. Described as a bay with “rocky shores dappled with tide pools, their perfectly still surfaces reflecting the grandeur of the sky above”, rumours said the pools were populated by all manner of bioluminescent flora and fauna. Populations of “sea stars and anemones glittered below the surface”, with “glowing chitons zipping back and forth like shooting stars”. If the stories were to be believed, sailing through the bay of the Wishing Pools on the night of the new moon with a sizeable contribution of coin would allow a sailor to will their heart's desire into existence.

After several dead ends, the Adrift tracked down the Wishing Pools and used their power to grant full life to Mandible. Unwrapping themself from the bow, Mandible slithered into the Immateria Sea, unfurling to their full length for the first time. Snout to tail tip, Mandible was roughly the length of the ship.

While they enjoyed several years with the crew, in the spring of 1666, Mandible reported feeling “a deep and primal call” and that “it was their time”. Following this, Mandible would dive into the Depths, a seemingly extradimensional space located at a depth of at least 2000 fathoms. This would mark the last sighting of Mandible by the crew, making them one of the few crew members who would not be present for the events of 1667.

Wyatt Mason (Season 14 birth)/IF-1667

AVAST!
The waters beyond this point are uncharted, tales from distant shores echoed back into our reality.

Background

The following accounts can be traced to a single leather-bound journal originally found in a locked wooden chest alongside a sextant-like device of indeterminate origin and a shell that matches no known species of mollusc. The chest was located in a storage room in the Legscraper’s lower levels that was described as “smelling faintly of the sea”. Subsequent attempts to locate and navigate to said room have been unsuccessful thus far. The journal details the exploits of the crew of a large sailing vessel, The Tokyo Adrift, descriptions of which are largely consistent with mid-17th century galleons.

With The Tokyo Adrift

Wyatt Mason joined the crew of The Tokyo Adrift late into their time on the Immateria Seas. She was first heard by navigator Yusef Fenestrate whose crystalline growths were able to pick up her high-frequency calls from leagues away. When the water-dwelling members of the crew were dispatched to investigate, they found Mason trapped in a cavern, sealed shut by fallen debris. An earthquake had destabilised her home and caused a cave-in. The journal entry dated one day prior confirms that the ship had experienced the effects of an earthquake and the subsequent waves formed by the sudden movement of the sea floor. Reverberations from the aftershock likely collapsed the entrance to Mason’s subaquatic home. Over the next day, with great effort from the crew, the boulders were removed and Mason was welcomed into the crew of the Adrift.

Entries regarding Wyatt Mason in the journal are lengthy and oddly personal, lacking the formal register much of the journal employs. The writer describes sharing “an unplaceable feeling of kinship” with the young mermaid. Mason claimed to have come from a large pod of mermaids, with so many siblings their parents had given up on unique names and instead numbered them off, to which the writer responded “of all the Wyatt Masons, she was number one, the first and the utmost”. Subsequent entries refer to Mason with the moniker “One”.

One was described as “affable and infectiously optimistic”, getting along well with the seasoned members of the crew. In particular, she shared a bond with Aly Leaf and Yusef Fenestrate, possibly owing to their shared affinity for the Immateria Seas or the latter pair’s role in orchestrating her rescue from the sunken cave. Boatswain Engine Eberhardt worked with her to develop modifications for the Adrift to amplify and utilise her sonar capabilities for navigation and the location of sunken ships.

Sketches and descriptions of One’s appearance depict her as largely humanoid from the waist up, with the tail of a water-dwelling mammal. Physiological descriptions are similar to that of the modern day Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin, known for its distinctive pink-white colouration.

In the last few pages of the journal, One is shown to have followed Wyatt Quitter after the latter left the ship following a disagreement with the captain. While she attempted to communicate their location to the crew, Fenestrate eventually lost her frequency when the pair swam a great distance away from the ship, though charting their path indicates they were heading towards the Bay of Stasis. The final entry of the journal is illegible. Large portions of the text are REDACTED out and others still are obscured by a noise-like mosaic of black and grey splotches. The REDACTED and the ultimate fate of the Adrift is REDACTED

Coolname Galvanic/IF-1667

AVAST!
The waters beyond this point are uncharted, tales from distant shores echoed back into our reality.

Background

The following accounts can be traced to a single leather-bound journal originally found in a locked wooden chest alongside a sextant-like device of indeterminate origin and a shell that matches no known species of mollusc. The chest was located in a storage room in the Legscraper’s lower levels that was described as “smelling faintly of the sea”. Subsequent attempts to locate and navigate to said room have been unsuccessful thus far. The journal details the exploits of the crew of a large sailing vessel, The Tokyo Adrift, descriptions of which are largely consistent with mid-17th century galleons.

With The Tokyo Adrift

Voyages on the Immateria Seas are rife with dangers untold especially to the unsuspecting sailor. Aside from the expected difficulties associated with months-long sea voyages, the journal outlines the hazards posed by localised weather events endemic to the region. Of these, the entries describe Rogue Waves to be among the most feared and dreaded by any experienced seafarer, seemingly coinciding with the new moon (or possibly lunar eclipses; as one entry describes, “darkness fell, as if the moon herself were afraid of what was to come", however whether this refers to an ecliptical event or cloud cover is the subject of much debate). Rogue Waves were known to cause heavy damage to the hulls of sailing vessels, but more significant was their tendency to sweep members of the crew away without a trace, only for the ships to find a fresh stowaway on board. Yet another report in the journal describes sightings of mysterious entities contemporaneously appearing with rogue wave events. The journal collectively refers to these entities as “Arbiters”, and while references are sparse and secondhand, they are often described as vaguely humanoid with glowing eyes and constantly dripping with Immateria.

A sailor met by the writer while on shore leave shared the following:

I saw it rise from the seas, like Davy Jones himself come to take joy in our misery. The figure watched as our whole damn ship nearly capsized. Johnson never stood a chance. Then, it produced a small book from its cloak, made a single tally mark and directly locked eyes with me before sinking back beneath the waves.

Descriptions of Coolname Galvanic share many similarities to that of these arbiters. The writer never received verbal confirmation of this assertion from Galvanic, but describes seeing “flashes of light from behind its large black eyeglasses, especially when tempers flared”. Galvanic was consistently depicted as wearing eyeglasses, the lenses of which appear to have been made of smokey quartz or a polarising crystal similar in composition to navigator Yusef Fenestrate’s fingers. A crew member grabbed by Galvanic for stability when the vessel was rocked by large waves was surprised to find “ring shaped marks left on the skin where contact was made, similar to the skin of an octopus’ prey”.

Galvanic joined the crew of The Tokyo Adrift following a near miss with a Rogue Wave. It was found washed up on the quarterdeck whereupon it promptly stood up, adjusted “a comically large tricorne hat” and introduced itself to Captain Strongbody, beginning negotiations for a contract of its employment. Following this event, Galvanic managed the ledgers of the ship, working alongside its quartermaster, showing a remarkable understanding of maritime and trade law and an ability to draft watertight contracts.

The question of Galvanic’s lineage would arise again when numerous [REDACTED] approaching the vessel and it was forced to employ its [REDACTED], defending [REDACTED] further damage. Despite the apparent lack of actual seawater (the seas are described as being composed of Immateria), the last page of the journal is heavily water-damaged and rendered unreadable.

Wyatt Quitter/IF-1667

AVAST!
The waters beyond this point are uncharted, tales from distant shores echoed back into our reality.

Background

The following accounts can be traced to a single leather-bound journal originally found in a locked wooden chest alongside a sextant-like device of indeterminate origin and a shell that matches no known species of mollusc. The chest was located in a storage room in the Legscraper’s lower levels that was described as “smelling faintly of the sea”. Subsequent attempts to locate and navigate to said room have been unsuccessful thus far. The journal details the exploits of the crew of a large sailing vessel, The Tokyo Adrift, descriptions of which are largely consistent with mid-17th century galleons.

With The Tokyo Adrift

Wyatt Quitter is described in the journal as a crew member, just another crew member. They first left the crew joined the crew left them all behind.

Originating from the port city of Infinity Plains, located in the Bay of Angels, they were known to have worked multiple jobs prior to their employment aboard The Tokyo Adrift, before they screwed them up, they always screw it up. a trend that continued during their time with the crew. At different points, Quitter took upon the roles of: powder monkey, writer, carpenter, window washer a window of opportunity, cook, and barrelman among others.

Physical descriptions vary from smooth, mirror, windows to the soul, a reflection past the surface are nondescript. Diagrams and sketches of Quitter's physiology are inconsistent but frequently feature webbed feet but degradation of the ink has made the diagrams incomplete and attempts to identify related species are irrelevant. Quitter was and continues to be a crew member no matter what happens to them.

Quitter is described as being on amicable terms with the crew but being especially close to the water-dwelling Aly Leaf and Wyatt "One" Mason. I can't screw this One up. Quitter was the only member of the crew to be able to swim unimpeded through Leaf's kelp forest, "the fronds parting way for them" as they searched for the missing Captain Strongbody and Goodwin Morin. As for One, Quitter describes sharing “an unplaceable feeling of kinship” with the young mermaid, I am her and she is me. The pair are last described in one of the final entries of the journal. The following entry depicts the final known interaction between Quitter and the crew.

Travel Log: August 28 1667
There was a heated confrontation with the captain, during which I said overheard Quitter saying 'I won't sit around and do nothing. That thing, it could mean the end for us. All of us.' The captain attempted to claim insubordination and relegate me Quitter to a week's duty in the orlop deck, the lowest in the ship, but my their mind was made up and Cap'n Strongbody was left on the quarterdeck alone while I they dived straight into the drink

One was last spotted following Quitter as they raced away from the ship. Silly girl, worry about yourself first. Yusef Fenestrate was able to receive One's sonar frequencies until about 4 leagues of distance were put between the absconding pair and the ship. Further attempts to track the pair were unsuccessful. By Grollis Zephyr and Fenestrate's best estimates, the pair were likely charting a course toward the Bay of Stasis, a location so named for its apparent lack of tidal currents or wind patterns. Earlier journal entries explain that the calm appearance of the bay belies the dangers posed to sailing vessels. Windless storms with pink lightning and high-pitched, droning peals of thunder were "known to vibrate the mightiest of ships into pieces, shaking nails out of place and reducing the vessels into loose piles of timber". Entire crews were lost having "been fed back into the hungry maw of the bay". The final entry of the journal is illegible. Large portions of the text are ████████ out and others still are obscured by a noise-like mosaic of black and grey splotches. The bodies were never found and the ultimate fate of the Adrift is ██████████

An excerpt from the journal reads:

i don't know how long i have
or if you can even read this
tell them it was a mistake
we can't change the future
don't give up on me
i haven't given up on you